Letters

Letters

Letters

10/02/2013

Like it? Tweet it! SHARE IT!

For the record
There are a couple of minor errors in the article “Aiming for Answers” (Sept. 12).        
I did not meet with the WPRA; my wife Terri represented us at those meetings, as I needed to be elsewhere.

The plan presented to the Design Commission was a proposal to install locking cabinets around the targets in order to make the range a hiking trail for all but a few hours a week. The proposal to build a fence died at the first Recreation and Parks Commission meeting.

The proposed fence would not have gone around the range, but through it. The plan was to split the range in half, with targets 1-14 being open for use during all park hours, and targets 15-28 being off-limits except for during weekend tournaments and classes. The neighbors were told that the Pasadena Roving Archers were demanding the fence, when in actuality it was the opposite.

What’s not really stated here is that there is a perfectly safe and quite beautiful hiking trail along the outside edge of the range, which anyone can use at any time, whether archery is being practiced or not. The people demanding changes to the range insist that they absolutely must walk on a maintenance path through the range, a path that passes between the archers and their targets. They demand that they have the right to do so because “it’s a public park” and refuse to use the marked trail 40 yards to the east. There are signs posted at each end of the range specifically forbidding this practice.

Pasadena Municipal Code 3.32 states categorically that all recreational activities must be contained within their designated activity areas. The archery range is one such area; if the city were willing to prosecute them, the hikers who foolishly insist on walking through the range could be cited and fined; under PMC 3.24.030, they could be barred from ever setting foot in the park again. Sadly, the city declines to prosecute the wealthy and well-connected.

The comment that “one local resident claimed to have found two arrows in his yard” is inaccurate. There are two local residents who have property overlooking the archery range whose property lines extend down the cliff face to the floor of the canyon. One of these residents reportedly claims to have found many arrows on his hillside and in his yard over the last 60 years, although there have never been calls to the Pasadena Police Department and he has never shown the arrows to any representative of the Pasadena Roving Archers. 

If arrows have indeed landed at the top of the hill, it is completely unacceptable, and PRA would encourage any resident to call the police in such a case. We also strongly recommend that the city of Pasadena include in the rules of the range that bows may not be pointed into the air and must be drawn with the arrow pointed at the target.
 
~ JIM MacQUARRY, PASADENA

SAFETY, SAFETY, SAFETY
I spent a few years as an instructor with PRA. In all the time I was going there, we monitored the archers to prevent problems, such as archers who would improperly use their bows, hikers who would go around our “WARNING” signs and informing our visitors of what is expected of them. 

These ideals were more for safety measures to protect not only the people who visited this area, but also the neighbors, and no one was ever hurt because we conducted our sport in a safe and protective manner.  
Granted, some things have happened. There are pigheaded people who want to put themselves in danger. They do this so they can stop what we are doing, to get their opinion across.  

A couple of arrows have gone up the hill, no more than 30 feet or so above the range floor. They are retrievable, but only a few a year are found in places we cannot get to, because of the dense brush or poison ivy. In all that time, only once did I hear of an arrow in a backyard. What I am wondering is, was there someone shooting at off hours when we were not there?

I have always seen safety, safety, safety, under all conditions, as PRA was on the ball when we were on the range. 

I would be saddened to see the archery range curtailed from safely teaching this wonderful sport to future Olympians, kids and adult hobbyists, and many others curious abut the sport after seeing the Lord of the Rings films.  

Without places like the PRA or other archery ranges to teach archery safety, someone could go to a sporting goods store, WHERE THEY DO NOT TEACH SAFETY, and send an arrow into their sibling’s or neighbor’s body, and send that person to the hospital, or worse.

~ TIMOTHY SNYDER, VIA EMAIL

Re: “To frack or not to frack,” Sept. 12
Excellent article! Well researched and cogently presented without having an axe to grind. Kudos. 
  
~ PONE

Re: “Aiming for Answers,” Sept. 12
The Roving Archers are great, but there are other untrained and unsupervised members of the public who think they are archers who are not so great.  Archery is a martial art and a bow and arrow is a deadly weapon.  If the activity here can be policed and regulated and the liabilty is on the club and not on the taxpayers, then great.  If not, it should go away. 
  
~  VIVAVILLA

Re: “Divided We Fall,”  Sept. 5
Let the Council deliberate in public instead of trying to force some back room deal.  Let the council see both, and select on the merits. 
  
~  VIVAVILLA

Re: “Policing police,” Sept. 12
Good for John Kennedy to propose that a matter such as this be studied and discussed. Let the council actually deliberate on a real issue.  Civility is great and should be maintained, but it has come to mean that the council just nods its collective head and smiles. 
  
~  VIVAVILLA

Re: “Instant Replay,” Sept. 5
What? Kevin, really? YOU want to defy the greatest, most accomplished President of the United States ever? How dare you even consider the idea that Mr. Obama is wrong about anything. Really! Some people.
  
~  PAULG

LETTERS WANTED:
Have something on your mind that you’d like to share with the rest of the community? You’re in the right place: Our Letters to the Editor page, one of the most widely read sections of the paper.  Send your letters to kevinu@pasadenaweekly.com. Just remember, it usually takes two to three weeks for a letter to appear in print. 

DIGG | del.icio.us | REDDIT

Like it? Tweet it!

Related Articles

Post A Comment

Requires free registration.

(Forgotten your password?")