Six women have accused a judge on the Pasadena-based 9th Circuit US Court of Appeals of illicit behavior ranging from exposing one to pornography to making inappropriate comments.

According to the Washington Post, one former clerk said Judge Alex Kozinski, who served as chief judge of the 9th Circuit from 2008 to 2014, showed her pornography after calling her into his office and asking her if she thought it was photoshopped or if it aroused her.

“I was in a state of emotional shock, and what I really wanted to do was be as small as possible and make as few movements as possible and to say as little as possible to get out,” Heidi Bond told the Post.

Another clerk, Emily Murphy, said Kozinski told her after she talked about the gym at the 9th Circuit that she should work out naked in front of several people.

Murphy said she tried steering the conversation away from the topic, but the longtime jurist kept returning to the image of her not wearing any clothing.

Bond and Murphy spoke to the paper on the record and gave their names. Four other women spoke on the condition that their names not be used.

Both women sent emails to friends in the respective 2008 and 2012 incidents.

One of the other women said that Kozinski made inappropriate comments toward them. Another one of the unidentified clerks said he looked at her body while talking to her.

The unidentified women did not file complaints.

In a statement, Kozinski said: “I have been a judge for 35 years and during that time have had over 500 employees in my chambers. I treat all of my employees as family and work very closely with most of them. I would never intentionally do anything to offend anyone and it is regrettable that a handful have been offended by something I may have said or done.”

After the story broke, he told the LA Times he had no recollection of showing porn to any of the clerks and he was not too worried about the allegations.

Kozinski was appointed to the 9th Circuit by President Ronald Reagan in 1985.

In a 2008 story, the Times reported that Kozinski had an email distribution list that he used to send out sexually themed jokes. The newspaper also reported that he had a publicly accessible website that contained pornographic images.

A judicial investigation ultimately found that Kozinski did not intend to allow material to go public and that Kozinski and his son were careless in the securing their private server.

Anthony J. Scirica, then the chief judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 3rd Circuit, wrote that Kozinski’s “conduct exhibiting poor judgment with respect to this material created a public controversy that can reasonably be seen as having resulted in embarrassment to the institution of the federal judiciary.”