Scoey Mitchlll

Scoey Mitchlll is survived by his sister, Mary Warren,

and his brother, jazz pianist Billy Mitchell of Pasadena.

Roscoe Mitchell Jr., whose stage name was Scoey Mitchlll, died March 19 after a colorful career during the ’70s and ’80s.

The comedian/actor, writer and TV director appeared on “Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour,” the “Ed Sullivan Show,” “The Joey Bishop Show” and 1970s game shows, including “Match Game,” “Tattletales,” “Hollywood Squares,” and had a recurring role on “Rhoda.”

In 1970, he starred in the short-lived series “Barefoot in the Park” (based on the Neil Simon play). It was the first American TV sitcom since “Amos ’n’ Andy” to have a predominantly Black cast.

During its first few episodes, “Barefoot in the Park” developed behind-the-scenes strife that sealed its fate: Mitchlll was fired due to “differences of opinion” with the series’ producers. 

The “differences” were rooted in Michlll’s attempt to get more Blacks in jobs behind the camera and as script writers. 

Mitchlll guest-starred in many television series, including “The Odd Couple,” “Six Million Dollar Man,” “Baretta” and “Cops.”

In the ’80s he turned to directing, writing and producing made-for-TV movies “Me and Mrs. C” and “13 East.”

The ’90s marked his retirement from the business, and he directed his time and energy to the collection and refurbishment of classical automobiles. He is survived by his sister, Mary Warren, and brother, jazz pianist Billy Mitchell of Pasadena.